Hi,

Some time ago a designer created a website layout for me and the design has only several colors: blue, gray, dark gray (almost black). Later I worked with another designer who created the logo for me. The problem is that the logo uses different colors, 3 of which are not found anywhere on the website and since I don't know anything about design, I wonder whether it is OK or not. I am attaching a screenshot and will highly appreciate any comments about the logo: Do the colors look good? Is it OK to have the middle part of the title (Web) that much bold? Here's a screenshot: alt text

3 answers

kemie 247
1
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This was chosen as the best answer

Judging from that screenshot the combination looks good. The light blue used in the site matches well with the light blue in the logo, so it doesn't matyter that not ALL colors are used (it's actually a good thing ;) )

Answered about 6 years ago by kemie
  • Thanks! Eugene about 6 years ago
  • Yup, it breaks up the monotony. Vinny Burgh about 6 years ago
3
points

I think your logo designer did a very nice job. The colors he used are making your logo a lot more visible. It is also a very easy logo to remember. If your customers have seen your logo for a couple of times they will probably remember it when the logo is shown on a different website. The colors he used are matching the tones of the layout, it fits pretty well.

The bold part in your name makes clear what your service is partly about, about the web I guess. And if it's not about the web, than you should think about getting rid of the bold.

But I think it's more than OK.

Answered about 6 years ago by simbilim
ZJR 0
0
points

The design you're referring to only sports two colors: shades of gray and cyan.
The logo already contains cyan, and grays don't usually clash against colors.
(As they are not, technically speaking, colors)

Anyway you seem to believe design rules are set in stone, which is all but true.
Some colors may clash, yes, and there are rules using which even a color blind person could determine it.
But sometimes the clash is desired.

It all depends on the message you're trying to convey, and color clashes (like dissonances in modern music) sometime find their place. The only real general rule I can think of is "What works, works"

Answered about 6 years ago by ZJR