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Questions:

  1. The Adobe fonts look distinctly clearer and much better than Arial. Any particular reason?
  2. Why does Adobe Caslon Pro show up among "C"s? (I know, Caslon starts with "C", but the font's name starts with "A", right?)
  3. Are more fonts like these available somewhere? (By "these", I mean non decorative, regular, and smooth)
  4. Why are there two versions of certain fonts like Adobe Heiti, which has: @Adobe Heiti and Adobe Heiti (which are not exactly the same, btw.)

Thanks.

2 answers

4
points
This was chosen as the best answer

The Adobe fonts look distinctly clearer and much better than Arial. Any particular reason?

That will depend on what operating system you're using, if you have Clear-Type turned on if it's windows, and if you're viewing on a TFT screen or a CRT, all things considered there should be no difference between the rendering, so maybe you are looking at them with software that turns on sub-pixel rendering for adobe fonts?

Like Adobe Type Manager?

ATM smooths the display of Type 1 fonts at any point size by rasterizing the Type 1 font's outline file. Rasterizing is the process of converting the font information into a scalable bitmap image. After creating the scalable bitmap image, ATM scales the image to the size you use, smoothes the edges of the image, and then displays the smoothed image (that is, the font) on-screen. If ATM cannot rasterize a Type 1 outline file, text may not appear correctly on-screen.

Why does Adobe Caslon Pro show up among "C"s? (I know, Caslon starts with "C", but the font's name starts with "A", right?)

Adobe is not the name of the font - the name of the font is Caslon, and that version is Adobe's version, if you had other versions of Caslon, then they would be alongside the Adobe version, rather than having all Adobe's fonts listed under 'a'

Are more fonts like these available somewhere? (By "these", I mean non decorative, regular, and smooth)

Seriously?

There are thousands of fonts to choose from, try searching on the fonts.com site :

http://www.fonts.com/FindFonts/Classifications.htm

Why are there two versions of certain fonts like Adobe Heiti, which has: @Adobe Heiti and Adobe Heiti (which are not exactly the same, btw.)

I'm going to guess that one is a Type1 version and the other isn't.

Answered over 6 years ago by Tony Crockford
  • That explains it all. Only thing is, I was looking for fonts usable on the web, in two categories: 1) default: standard fonts that most people would have 2) font-face Aviral Dasgupta over 6 years ago
  • Ah, that's a different question! google for font stacks, or read: http://www.awayback.com/revised-font-stack/ and http://www.miltonbayer.com/font-face/ Tony Crockford over 6 years ago
  • Thanks. Aviral Dasgupta over 6 years ago
  • Great answer. +1 Marko Ivanovski over 6 years ago
1
point
  1. Arial is a terrible, terrible font that exists only because Microsoft was too cheap to license Helvetica.
  2. Different applications sort fonts in different ways. Some use the file name while others will use the display name. Still others will further group them by type, so your PostScript fonts will be in a different location than your TrueTypes or OpenTypes, etc.
  3. There are thousands upon thousands of fonts available; most are unusable on the web.
  4. Look at the specimens and see.
Answered over 6 years ago by Nathan Duran
  • What exactly do you mean by "unusable on the web"? If you mean commercial fonts that don't have licenses for online use via font-face, then I agree. Other than licensing I see no reason why you shouldn't be able to use the majority of fonts out there online or offline alike. Alan Plum over 6 years ago