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1 answer

1
point

It will fall back on the browser's default style. You can change this behavior by specifying that it should inherit its style from its parent instead.

.style1 {
    font-family:"somefont" inherit;
    }

Note that IE does not support inheritance. Adding to what the guy below me says, you should always include a fallback generic font type in your stacks, such as serif or sans-serif.

Answered almost 10 years ago by Rob Nixon
  • This. It's good practice to explicitly declare font stacks. Daryl Claudio almost 10 years ago